by: Rebecca Taylor

I personally find sending out my work frightening and between blogging, monthly newspaper articles and calls for writing, I have probably sent out over eight hundred different texts and had most of them returned with a form letter. Still, I continue to write because sometimes, people like what I write, sometimes I get an acceptance and that is an amazing feeling.  So, for this month’s writing topic, I’ve decided to tell you some things you need to remember when sending out your work:

 

  • The most important thing is that no matter how many rejection notices we receive, we remember why we write – because we love it, because it is a part of us and we know that somewhere out there someone is going to like what we wrote.
  • We must be proud of our work. We took the time to sit down and put the words to paper/keyboard and after we’ve edited it, we’ve come up with something we want to share with the world.
  • We need to know that when we send our work out, and it comes back, it doesn’t mean we cannot write. It just means that our work didn’t fit the present need or wasn’t what that editor/panel of editors or judges was looking for. When you have only so many pages to fill in a specific time period and lots of talent, tough decisions must be made.
  • We need to get in the habit of sharing our work. If we do it infrequently, it is more frightening but the more I send out my work, the easier I find it to receive those rejection letters and I just type them into my Excel file and move on. I accept it and move on, knowing that someday that rejected piece of writing could make a lot of people happy or might even make me a lot of money. There are lots of famous authors who started out just like us. Were they frightened by the writing process, maybe but they found a way to get their work into our hands.
  • Use writing websites to share your work with other writers. The other writers will be in the same boat as you when it comes to you reading their writing.
  • While our writing is personal, we have to know that when it comes to sending it to publishing companies, it is a business deal and we must understand that while our hearts and numerous hours were poured into the writing, for the editor, it’s their business, whether it is a volunteer or paid position.
  • Know that when it comes to feedback, the ultimate decision on whether or not to make changes is yours but we must at least consider what the reader is saying. We can become too easily attached to our writing, to the words we spent so much time writing to know what we should change, what parts drag down the stories or what lines inhibit the flow of the writing.

 

I hope you find this advice helpful. Whether you’re just starting to write or have been writing for a long time, we are still going to have to go through the writing, sending and waiting processes. It might take a while but our writing has potential to find a niche somewhere or you could decide to self-publish, but that is a topic for another time.

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