by: Rebecca Taylor

            We’re human; we’re struck with all sorts of emotions at all sorts of times. We have wonderful days, happy days, exhausting days and sometimes sad days. Our minds are also full of many things like appointments, work commitments, family activities, shopping lists and household chores. How do we keep our writing momentum when all sorts of things are happening around us?

 1. We can have more than one writing project on the go at a time. If we are writing an incredibly happy story and we’re not in the mood to give it what it needs, we can switch to writing a different scene in the same story or we could switch to a different story, or we could do an exercise on writing about different emotions. I had to do this for a writing course I took, and I found it an interesting experience. It makes you think of the way emotions can be shown in your writing instead of just saying something generic like the girl looked happy. Here are a few examples of sentences I came up with from that exercise:

 

Fear: The fear in her heart stirred like dark clouds ready to pour rain.

Joy: Her face was joyous like a sunflower’s smile.

Anger: The pain he’d caused her was like torrential rains hammering the earth repeatedly.

Longing: Waiting for grass to grow would have been easier than longing he’d listen to her pleas.

2. Sometimes a story can go in so many directions and we get to a place where we don’t know what we should do and it could change the whole outcome of the story. We could write book blurbs (example, if I write the story like this the back of my book would maybe say…), or do an outlining activity or write a pro-con list to the possible outcomes. Example: Sarah could marry Jack or Steve. If she marries Jack she will have, but if she marries Steve she will have…

 3. Write anyways. Whether what you write stays in the final draft of your book in part or not at all doesn’t matter, what matters is that you are writing. What you write may lead you to another storyline you had never thought of before, or maybe even an idea for another book.

 4. Write a letter or a journal entry. It doesn’t have to be sent or shown to anyone. The point is something is that whatever has got you down or up is real and other people are experiencing it too. Are you mad at someone? Write it down, put those fiery emotions onto paper. A character may just need them someday. You can change them up when you need them so that no one knows the original situation.

 

Good luck. 

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