Posts from the ‘Christian’ Category

Hair dye, who am I?

It mattered, I had tried telling myself that it didn’t and I could move on. But the the truth was, I couldn’t hide from the way I felt about my hair.

The blond dye just wasn’t working for me. I used to have a dark brown hair and I had decided to try out this new color one day. I studied myself in the mirror and then went to apply my mascara, thinking that if my makeup looked good maybe no one would notice my weird hair color.

Who was I kidding? I loved the attention I got for a new hair color. I absolutely soaked them up with cutsie little “thank you’s” and a giddy smile.

Of course, it wasn’t really the hair that I was concerned about. I was worried about who I was and who I wanted to be. I was concerned about my appearance and how I wanted to come across. Maybe I was too focused on what other people thought but I didn’t know how to evaluate myself a different way.

I supposed I did know. I knew that my self-approval needed to come from the inside. It needed to come from the fact that Jesus made me in his image and he loved me more than any person on earth could ever love me. Some days this seemed like an easy task. Jesus loved me and that was all I needed.

But other days I just wanted someone to approve of who I was. I wanted someone on earth to show me their love. I wanted to be successful and famous and yet humble and kind.

I wanted it all.

Yet all I had was a new “do” and some fresh shampoo and conditioner for dyed hair. I finished with my makeup and fluffed my hair.

I looked in the mirror and told myself “Jesus loves you” and then left the room. Maybe this dye would help out after all.

Evangelizing Preparations

Clarissa looked down at the city and felt small. Between the skyscrapers, parking ramps and ridiculous amounts of cars, she wondered how she mattered. How it could mean anything when she did something.

Her best friend Jaimy came to stand next to her. “Ya know, I think it’s great to look down from a high window. I always see what God sees-people who are lost and broken.”

“And that’s good?” Clarissa asked.

Jaimy looked at her to gauge her seriousness before responding; “God has made it so this city of broken people breaks my heart like it breaks his.”

Clarissa looked down once more. The fog was beginning to roll away and she could see each building more clearly. “I don’t know, it just seems so big, like there is too much stuff to ever have an impact.”

“For I am not ashamed of the gospel of Christ for it is the power of God unto salvation to every one that believeth, Romans 1:16.” He replied, looking at me with what I like to call his ‘spiritual face.’ The face where Clarissa knew he was praying to God to figure out how to answer her innumerable questions and comments about her doubt in the faith.

His answer, of course, addressed the real problem. Clarissa knew, of course, that little things had an impact. That God could use her for his glory despite her doubt.

Clarissa was ashamed of the gospel sometimes. There was comfort in conformity and it was certainly okay to simply conform with the rest of the world, right?

Of course not. By the grace of God, Clarissa was saved. With that came the fact that she needed to share the gospel because who wouldn’t want to share the good news of Christ, the promise of salvation. How selfish did I need to be in order to forget that?

“I can see the wheels turning,” Jaimy said as he took a bite out of his apple. Clarissa turned and glared at him.

“Of course they are, Mr. Spiritual.” Clarissa said.

“Don’t shoot the messenger,” he replied, eyebrows raised and a smirk on his face. Clarissa rolled her eyes and walked over to the hotel table, grabbing a clementine.

“I would never shoot you,” Clarissa said as she took the peel off all in one piece, a small thing that always gave her great joy.

And it finally sunk in. Clarissa realized that God probably got joy from every small thing, no matter how insignificant, that his servants did for his glory.

“Lets go evangelize,” Clarissa told Jaimy and he smiled.

“Glory be to God.”

Leatherwood Lake

I left my house with my dog close on my heels.

Please, Jesus, help me with this!

I start walking to an old dock with worn wood and a little bench at the end. It sits on Leatherwood Lake.

Jesus, please send lots of people here!

I could fully see the dock. No one was there yet but I was early, anyways. I had gone around to the neighbor kids the last few weeks and told them I was starting Leatherwood Club. They were supposed to meet at the little dock in my backyard on Wednesday at 7pm if they wanted to join. I had just moved here at age 10 and didn’t know anyone.

Jesus, please send the neighbor kids here. I want some new friends and I can maybe even minister to them and lead them to you, Jesus.

I walked down to the dock and sat on the little bench.

And I waited. “You think they’re coming, Trent?” I asked my dog as he lounged on the dock at my feet. He turned his little eyes at me and waged his tail. I leaned over to pet him.

It was 7:08. I started to feel awkward. I was down at the dock by myself. No one had shown up yet.

Jesus, why won’t they come? What am I going to do?

I slid down so I was sitting right next to Trent on the dock and put my feet in the water. I angrily kicked at it.

Why is this happening, Jesus? What is wrong with wanting to start a club?

I waited until 7:15 and I was about to leave and go back up to my room in my parent’s house when I heard running feet and merry voices.

“We aren’t too late!” A girl’s voice said.

“What if she isn’t the same one?” A boys childish voice replied.

I was frozen, I couldn’t turn around. Someone had shown up! I was going to have a huge club with lots of people and we would have so much fun!

Thank you, Jesus!

“Hello?” The girl called in a breathless voice. I finally got the courage to turn around and was instantly disappointed. There were only two of them, just the girl and the boy I’d heard. Not tons of kids.

“Hello,” I replied before hastily adding my prepared line, “Welcome to the first meeting of Leatherwood Club!”

I didn’t feel very excited about the club anymore, but I tried to hide it because the girl’s eyes were lit up and she led the boy down the dock towards me.

“We are your neighbors down the street. I’m Kara and I live in the brown house with fake deer in the front and this-“

“I’m Kurt and,” he sat down on the dock with a plop, “I don’t think my parents love me. Do you love me?”

The girl turned to me as she sat down next to him, making us into a triangle plus Trent, to see what my reaction would be.

“Yes,” I replied with a smile at the cute boy. “Yes I do! Jesus does, too, you know.”

He looked at me, “Who is Jesus?”

The girl rolled her eyes at him before turning to me, “He hasn’t had much education.”

I smiled before I began to explain.

Thank you, Jesus, for bringing me these two kids. It’s not exactly what I wanted, but I want to love them and them to love me!

Leatherwood Club was official now!

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